(Source: hackleberryfinn)

chiliching:

Manila Kingpin: The Asiong Salonga Story winning 11 awards, including 8 major, gives hope to the degenerative state of the local mainstream film industry and proves that once in a while there’s an exception during the festival of shitty films.

Please release the director’s cut.

“Masarap mamatay sa kamay ng kaaway, ngunit masakit mamatay sa kamay ng kaibigan.”

thedailywhat:

Stop What You’re Doing And Watch The Hell Out Of This of the Day: “Look at yourself. Now back to me. Now back at yourself. Now back to me. Sadly, you are not a monster”: Grover is on a horse cow.

[sesamestreet.]

Growing older makes you not give a fuck anymore.
a sleeping pokemon blocks the path

a sleeping pokemon blocks the path

juliasegal:

lowlowchingchang:classics:sunnycyl:propagandery:
I have this Kirk Demarais print hanging at the end of my hallway. Click to see more of his family portrait series.

(via juliasegal)
Danny’s not here, Mrs. Torrance…

juliasegal:

lowlowchingchang:classics:sunnycyl:propagandery:

I have this Kirk Demarais print hanging at the end of my hallway. Click to see more of his family portrait series.

(via juliasegal)

Danny’s not here, Mrs. Torrance…

siesta

Nung bata pa ako, ayokong ayoko na pinapatulog ng tanghali. Ginagawa ko pa itong ninja-training: magkukunwari akong tulog na at kapag umalis na ang tita o lola ko na nagbabantay sa akin, kinukuha ko yung librong nakatago sa ilalim ng unan at nagbabasa ako imbes na matulog. Ayokong ayoko talagang mag-siesta noon. Pero ngayong matanda na ako, kahit magbayad pa ako makapagsiesta lang, gagawin ko. 

All Joy and No Fun

unburyingthelead:

“The broad message is not that children make you less happy; it’s just that children don’t make you more happy.” That is, he tells me, unless you have more than one. “Then the studies show a more negative impact.” As a rule, most studies show that mothers are less happy than fathers, that single parents are less happy still, that babies and toddlers are the hardest, and that each successive child produces diminishing returns. But some of the studies are grimmer than others. Robin Simon, a sociologist at Wake Forest University, says parents are more depressed than nonparents no matter what their circumstances—whether they’re single or married, whether they have one child or four.

The idea that parents are less happy than nonparents has become so commonplace in academia that it was big news last year when the Journal of Happiness Studies published a Scottish paper declaring the opposite was true. “Contrary to much of the literature,” said the introduction, “our results are consistent with an effect of children on life satisfaction that is positive, large and increasing in the number of children.” Alas, the euphoria was short-lived. A few months later, the poor author discovered a coding error in his data, and the publication ran an erratum. “After correcting the problem,”it read,“the main results of the paper no longer hold. The effect of children on the life satisfaction of married individuals is small, often negative, and never statistically significant.” […]

Before urbanization, children were viewed as economic assets to their parents. If you had a farm, they toiled alongside you to maintain its upkeep; if you had a family business, the kids helped mind the store. But all of this dramatically changed with the moral and technological revolutions of modernity. As we gained in prosperity, childhood came increasingly to be viewed as a protected, privileged time, and once college degrees became essential to getting ahead, children became not only a great expense but subjects to be sculpted, stimulated, instructed, groomed. (The Princeton sociologist Viviana Zelizer describes this transformation of a child’s value in five ruthless words: “Economically worthless but emotionally priceless.”) Kids, in short, went from being our staffs to being our bosses.

Keep those things away from me.